Highs, Lows and Plateaus upcoming VIDEOS

I have heard from a lot of people now that they would love to see some videos to accompany the Stages of Recovery that I talk about in my book.  These stages were defined by a Swedish Physical Therapist, Signe Brunnstrom (1966, 1970), who described the process of recovery following stroke-induced hemiplegia. The Brunnstrom Approach, emphasizes the importance of encouraging movement within the synergistic pattern of movement that evolves post-stroke. As the stroke survivor improves, the exercises change.

I have spent quite a bit of time working out a series of exercises to help progress clients through the Stages of Recovery.  Keep a look out for upcoming videos and feel free to share them!

In the past, I have been stymied at Stage 5 and not sure how to help promote individual movement of the fingers.  Recently, I have had the opportunity to demo the Music Glove by Flint Rehabilitation and am very excited about the potential to rediscover finger movement: https://www.flintrehabilitation.com

Look forward to more to come.  DOWNLOAD SLIDES 03-15

Progress in 2014

2014 was a good year… now cheers to 2015!

I wanted to highlight a few successes that some of my clients had in 2014:

K. received a new dynamic ankle brace and is now walking more than ever.  He reports that he can feel the muscles in his weak leg getting stronger, and he can walk over uneven ground, up /down stairs easily and finally can say that he enjoys walking again.

C. is using her fingers again!  Not quite two years post stroke and she is able to use her hand to help her with all kinds of daily activities.  She has returned to work full-time and has also gotten back in the routine of being “mom” in her family now. It was hard having her daughter and husband take care of the baby, but she is back. This year, is dedicated to fine motor control in those fingers!

E. became independent in transferring into the shower, is driving his own van, and is learning to walk again.  Not bad for someone who is not even three years post injury to his cervical spinal cord.  No need for an electric chair because he can push himself in his new lightweight chair and feels he is getting stronger (below the level of lesion) every day.

S. returned to work full time, is using her right hand for typing and is talking up a storm!  She and her family have fought hard.  Still a ways to go until this young woman feels satisfied with her recovery, but I have no doubt she will get there.

M. barely survived his stroke, but he is getting better every day.  He can stand independently, transfer for showers and walk short distances.  Mostly delayed now by distorted vision that makes it hard to move, but he is having a surgical procedure this week that hopes to improve his vision.

Just a few successes.  Would love to hear from others about the Highs, Lows, and Plateaus of recovery.

Cheers to 2015!

Getting the fingers working again!

So, I have decided that getting the fingers to work again after a stroke is one of the greatest challenges.  I would love to hear from people about what worked for you.   Fine control and dexterity are so uniquely human!  I have recently been studying the literature about how babies and young infants gain control of their finger function. Truly amazing how the brain and body interface goes from shoving a fisted hand into the mouth, to tying shoes, playing the piano, typing, and having unlimited motion and control at our fingertips.  Tell me your story so that we can then share it with other stroke survivors!