Humanity

This morning, my daughter asked me why animals begin walking shortly after they are born but it takes years for a baby to walk? The answer is not as simple as four versus two legs. If it were, then babies would begin crawling shortly after birth! Is it about size? That cannot be right since baby elephants, giraffes, and horses are far larger. Is it about survival? Perhaps. Is it about the complexity of the human nervous system? Most likely. The desire to walk it tantamount in recovery from injury! It is the driving force for much of physical rehabilitation. This complexity of the human nervous system also gives rise to the potential for neuroplasticity.

What are your thoughts on this topic? Would love to hear from you?

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The Highs and the Lows

It seems that each week, I hear from someone who has been told by their doctor “not to expect any further recovery.” Most recently, I heard this from a young man who had an incomplete Spinal Cord Injury only a few months ago! Such a statement by a doctor is utter non-sense, so I ask myself “Why would someone say that?”. What I have decided is that health care professionals play it safe by not promoting any form of expectation from their patients. If someone is told they will never do anything again, and then they accomplish something they are pleasantly pleased… in fact, they feel that they have beat the odds.

I think we need to let people expect more. We need to instill hope through information and education and resources. No false promises, but rather the opportunity to believe in the power of neurorecovery and the strength and resilience of the human spirit.

Well two months after meeting that young man, he has already made tremendous gains and yet the words of his doctor still haunt him. It will take a long time to diffuse the negativity of comments that are destructive to the potential of hope, handwork and neuroplasticity.